Post Appointment Instructions

Before each in-office service and procedure we perform, we will carefully discuss in depth with you what you can expect during and after treatment. In order to extend our care from our office to your home, we have provided our Post-Op Instructions online to help answer any post-op questions and to educate you on proper after-care. If you have any questions at all, please do not hesitate to call our office.

 

· Tooth- Colored Fillings

· Oral Surgery

· Veneers, Crown & Bridges 

· Root Canal Treatment

· Bruxism Guard

· Scaling And Root Planing

· Tooth Whitening/Bleaching

· After Sedation Dentistry Patient Instruction

· Self Care Tips For People With TMD  ( Jaw Pain)    

                                                                           

Tooth Color Filling

Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.

Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure from this procedure. This is COMPLETELY normal. The more invasive the procedure, the more sensitivity you may experience. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better, (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine. There is no need for concern.

We have prescribed ibuprofen (Advil). This IS NOT for pain. Ibuprofen is to reduce the inflammation in the area worked on, and will further eliminate hot, cold and pressure sensitivity if taken as directed. If you are allergic to or cannot tolerate ibuprofen ( Advil, etc) please advise us. If discomfort continues for more than a couple of weeks, please call our office.

Once the anesthesia has worn off and you feel as though any of the teeth we have worked on are hitting first, please give the office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted.

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Oral Surgery

Things To Expect

Bleeding: Bleeding or “oozing” for the first 12 to 24 hours.

Swelling: This is normal following a surgical procedure in the mouth. It should reach its’ maximum in two to three days, and should begin to diminish by the fifth post-operative day.

Discomfort: Any discomfort you will experience will occur after the anesthesia has worn off. This should diminish within 1-3 days.

Things To Do

Bleeding: Place gauze over extraction sites and maintain pressure by biting for at least 2 hours. Replace gauze every 30 minutes within these 2 hours. Keep head elevated and rest. Do not suck or spit excessively. (Also please refrain from blowing into musical instruments.)

Note: Some oozing and discoloration of saliva is normal. If bleeding persists, replace the gauze with a clean folded gauze placed over the extraction site, and maintain the pressure until the bleeding stops.

Rinsing: 24 hours after the surgery, rinse with warm saltwater (or prescription mouth rinse) three-to-five times per day for seven days.

Swelling
Place ice or cold compresses on the region of surgery for ten minutes every half-hour for the first eight to twelve hours.

Note: Ice bags or cold compresses should be used only on the day of surgery.

Smoking
Avoid smoking during the healing period.

Discomfort
Begin taking pain medication immediately after surgery as directed. The medicine will require 45 minutes to one hour to take effect.

Diet
A nutritious liquid or soft diet may be necessary for the first weeks after the surgery. A fluid intake of at least two quarts a day is needed.

Physical Activity
For the first 24 to 48 hours, you should REST. Patients who have sedation should refrain from driving an automobile or from engaging in any task requiring alertness for the next 24 hours.

The Days After Surgery:

· Brush teeth carefully.

· Use WARM SALT WATER (or prescription mouth rinse) as a mouth rinse, three to five times per day.

· If ANTIBIOTICS are prescribed, be SURE to take ALL that have been prescribed, AS DIRECTED.

· Use WARM, MOIST HEAT on face for swelling. Continue until the swelling subsides. A warm, wet washcloth or heating pad will suffice.

· If SUTURES were used, return to the office in five to seven days for removal.

· DRY SOCKET is a delayed healing response, which may occur during the second to fourth post-operative day. It is associated with a throbbing pain on the side of the face, which may seem to be directed up toward the ear. In mild cases, simply increasing the pain medication can control the symptoms. If this is unsuccessful, please call our office .

CONTACT THE DOCTOR IF:

· Bleeding is excessive and cannot be controlled.

· Discomfort is poorly controlled.

· Swelling is excessive, spreading or continuing to enlarge after 48 hours.

· Allergic reactions to medications occur which are causing a generalized rash or excessive bleeding.

CONTACT EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES OR CALL 911 if patient has lost consciousness.

Following all instructions faithfully will add to your comfort and fast recover

Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.

Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure after this procedure. Your gum tissue may also be tender. This is COMPLETELY normal. The more invasive the procedure, the more sensitivity you may experience. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In a very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine. There is no need for concern.

We have prescribed ibuprofen (Advil). This IS NOT for pain. Ibuprofen is to reduce the inflammation in the area worked on, and will further eliminate hot, cold and pressure sensitivity if taken as directed. If you are allergic to or cannot tolerate ibuprofen, ( Advil, etc) please advise us. If discomfort continues for more than a couple of weeks, please call our office .

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Veneers, Crown & Bridges/Temporary Crown/Bridge 

is extremely important for the temporary crown/bridge to remain on the tooth until we seat your permanent crown. If your temporary crown becomes loose or comes off at any time, please call the office immediately. Your tooth can shift within a few hours if your temporary is missing, which can inhibit the placement of your permanent crown. You may also experience sensitivity if your temporary comes off.

Please note: With your temporary, avoid hard and chewy foods (such as ice, hard candy, gum, taffy). These are known to pull temporaries off the prepared tooth.

If your temporary comes off or becomes loose, please gently replace your temporary back onto your prepared tooth and call the office (you cannot put your temporary back on incorrectly because it will only fit one way).

It is important to floss your temporary. However, instead of pulling the floss back up through the teeth, release one end of the floss and pull it through the side of the tooth.

Once the anesthesia has worn off and you feel as though any of the teeth we worked on are hitting first, please give the office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted. 

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 Endodontic Treatment (Root Canal) - Post-Operative Instructions 

1.  Root canal treatment can take 1,2, or more appointments, depending on the conditions present in each case. During that time any of the following symptoms may be present: sensitivity to hot or cold, sensitivity to pressure, or swelling.

2.  Some tenderness can be expected after each appointment. It is best to start taking either an over-the-counter pain medicine (Advil or Motrin 200 mg., or Tylenol), or the pain medicine prescribed to you. These are most effective if taken before the office anesthetic wears off.

3.  If an antibiotic has been prescribed to you, be certain to take it as directed. Be certain to finish all the pills regardless of how well you feel.

4.  If swelling or pain is present after 2 days of your last appointment or is increasing, your medication may need to be adjusted. Contact the office immediately.

5.  If your bite feels high or if pain occurs with light biting, your bite may to be adjusted due to inflammation around the tooth. This is a short appointment. Please call the office immediately.

6.  A temporary has been placed in the tooth. This restoration is not very durable and is prone to breakage or dislodgment if not treated carefully. Avoid sticky foods (gum, taffy, caramels, etc.), and hard foods (chewing ice, nuts and hard candy).

7.  Floss your temporary restoration gently. Just clean and pull floss out to the side (do not bring the floss up), so temporary filling will not “pop off”.

8.  The tooth is often very weak during therapy. Avoid biting on hard objects until the tooth is properly restored with a filling or crown after therapy is completed.

9.  Hot food or beverage can be harmful to anesthetized tissues. Please avoid drinking hot coffee, etc., until the numbness wears off.

10.  Should you have greater than expected sensitivity, discomfort on biting, if your temporary filling becomes loose or broken, please call the office immediately. 

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What we want you to know…about your Bruxism Guard

Your Bruxism guard (grinding appliance, brux guard, night guard, occlusal splint) is specifically designed to both protect your teeth and your jaw joint (TMJ). 

· Depending on your diagnosis/symptoms, your guard may be worn:

· Regularly at night

·  Nightly during periods of stress and/or

· During the day when you are under stress

· Your speech may initially be affected. This is transient and you will learn very quickly how to talk with your guard. Reading out loud will help speed up the process.

· You may initially find that you are salivating a lot. Again as you body gets used to the appliances, the salivary flow rate will return to normal.

· Although it may take some time to get used to wearing the appliance, you should not experience any tenderness. It is important that the guard is comfortable. If a sore spot develops or a tooth/teeth feel tender when the appliance is removed, please call the office so we can adjust it.

· The bite should also feel comfortable and balanced with both sides touching evenly. If it is uncomfortable or you feel the bite is heavier in some areas than others, please call the office so we can adjust it.

· Please bring your appliance to your regular dental check-ups/cleaning appointments so we can check its fit and function. They occasionally need adjustment as they wear.

· Remember to brush your brux guard with tooth paste and your brush when it is removed. Rinse it with water and store it in its’ protective case. In addition, your guard should be soaked once a week in a commercial denture cleaning product of your choice, or my favorite, one tsp of dishwashing crystals in a glass of hot water for 30 minutes. Rinse it well after.

· Dogs love brux guards and will chew them; store it in a safe place.

· If you have a Thermoplastic brux guard, remember to run it under hot water before us 

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Scaling and Root Planing: Post-procedure Instructions

The dental prophylaxis just completed has been preventive in nature due to your thorough oral self-care. That means that there was no gum disease evident. The prophylaxis was completed quickly and with the minimum of trauma to your teeth and soft tissues. In this event, you should have insignificant postoperative discomfort in your mouth. Congratulations on a job well done. Keep up the good work. We would rather assist you in preventing periodontal disease than in curing the problems periodontal disease can cause.

A therapeutic prophylaxis has been completed. In this case, the gingival (gum) tissue showed signs of infection and inflammation and you may have had significant calculus (tartar) buildup. You may notice that your teeth feel different where the calculus was removed. The soft tissues may be sensitive or sore for approximately one day as they begin to heal. You may find that taking an over-the-counter pain reliever (aspirin, ibuprofen, etc.) will help during this 24-hour period. You may also rinse your mouth every few hours with warm salt water. Make sure that you brush and floss your teeth during this time period as you have been instructed. Be gentle, because the brushed areas may be sore, but be thorough! You do not want to have the periodontal infection begin again.

When you have had scaling and root planing, or other more involved periodontal procedures, you can expect your gingival (gum) tissues to be quite sore. This is normal when the gum tissues have been infected and inflamed for some time. The more severely they have been affected, the more discomfort you can expect. This soreness should go away very quickly. You may rinse with warm salt water every few hours until the soreness is gone.

You may also notice that the teeth have become sensitive to temperature changes after the scaling and root planing. This sensation frequently occurs when the surfaces of the roots of your teeth have been cleaned. Removal of the debris covering the roots and attached to the roots leaves the roots open to temperature stimulus. If the problem persists, please let us know.

When you examine your gums closely in a mirror, you will also observe that the color, texture, and position of your periodontal tissues will undergo a change as the healing takes place. The swollen, reddened gum tissue will shrink, become more firm, and return to a healthy pink color. Watch for these welcome signs of improvement and be encouraged by the healing process.

Please do not forget to brush, floss, and use other periodontal cleaning aids as you have been taught. It is important that you begin establishing proper oral self-care habits immediately. If you find that the recently treated areas are sensitive to the brushing and flossing, be gentle, but be thorough! With proper technique you cannot damage the teeth or gingival tissues.

Brush after every meal with a fluoride-containing toothpaste. Rinse with a fluoride-containing mouth rinse once each day.

Use the oral irrigator with the periodontal attachment as instructed.

Use the periodontal cleaning aids as you have been shown.

Please return for your followup appointment. During this time, your periodontal tissues will be evaluated for the expected improvement and effectiveness of your oral self-care and to determine the possible necessity of further periodontal treatment. This appointment will include re probing the periodontal tissues.

Because of your periodontal condition, we strongly recommend that you return for your next examination and preventive prophylaxis appointment.

If you have any questions about these instructions, please feel free to ask us.     

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TEETH WHITENING  POST-OPERATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

Teeth Whitening/ Tooth Bleaching

It is common for teeth to be sensitive for a few days following teeth whitening procedures. Occasionally the sensitivity will last much longer. Patients may describe this sensitivity as a momentary tingling or stinging sensation. This is a common post operative symptom that usually resolves within a few days. You may take two to three anti-inflammatory, pain relieving tablets like Advil or Motrin 200mg as directed for the rest of the day of your appointment. You may take two tablets before sleeping if necessary. The sensitivity should have largely subsided by the next day, if you are allergic to Motrin/Advil or have a stomach ulcer, substitute with Tylenol. If you encounter severe sensitivity or sensitivity that persists for more than a week, contact our office  for an evaluation.

Use a Fluoride mouthwash  and Sensodyne toothpaste, several times a day for the week following the bleaching. Avoid tobacco, coffee, tea and dark colored sodas and staining types of foods. If you must indulge, rinse with water immediately afterwards to minimize the staining effects.

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After Sedation Dentistry - Patient Instructions 

· Patient cannot drive for 24 hours after sedation.

· Do not operate any hazardous devices for 24 hours.

· A responsible person should be with the patient until he/she has fully recovered from the effects of the sedation.

·  Patient should not go up and down stairs unattended. Let the patient stay on the ground floor until recovered.

· Patient can eat whenever and whatever he/she wants, and patient needs to eat even if he/she does not want to do so.

· Patient needs to drink plenty of fluids as soon as possible. The patients who eat and drink plenty of fluids do the best and usually recuperate the quickest - most within 24 hours.

· Patient may sleep for a long time or may be alert when he/she leaves our office. Attend to both alert and sleepy patients in the same manner; don’t trust him/her alone.

· Always hold patient’s arm when walking.

· Call us if you have any questions or difficulties. If you feel that your symptoms warrant a physician and you are unable to reach us, go to the closest emergency room immediately.

Following most surgical procedures there may or may not be pain, depending on your threshold for pain.

Because of the medications used for sedation, the following regimine is used on the day of treatment: You may take 2 acetaminophen (Tylenol) followed by 2 Ibuprofen (Advil) 3 hours later. Alternate these medications every 3 hours (Example: Tylenol - 3 hours - Advil - 3 hours -Tylenol - 3 hours - Advil - 3 hours, etc.).

Taking these medications in this fashion is as potent as any narcotic because you still have the sedation medication in your system. Most people don’t need other medication. If you do need pain medication the next day, just call our office and we will call in the appropriate prescription for you.

If you have any questions about these medications interacting with other medications you are presently taking, please call our office first, your physician and/or your pharmacist. 

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 Self Care tips for people with TMD 

· Avoid opening the mouth too wide

· Stifle yawns to prevent opening the mouth too wide.

· Take small bites of food. Cut apples, sandwiches or other large foods into small pieces.

·  Apply heat and cold, stretch

· Freeze a Styrofoam cup of water and cut off the upper portion, exposing the ice.Apply ice to jaw muscles, stretching the mouth open and closed 20 times. Follow with warm compresses (a hot wet face cloth) and stretching for ideally 15-20 minutes.

Dental Treatment

· The day before and the day after: warm compresses to the sides of the face, a minimum of twice daily, 10 minutes each time. More is better.

· The day of treatment: after your appointment, apply ice to the joint area and jaw muscles in 10-minute intervals.

· Avoid long dental appointments if possible.Take frequent breaks during appointments.

· Rest your jaw muscles and the jaw joint

· Avoid chewing gum, biting nails, chewing your cheek or biting pencils.

· Avoid clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth.Throughout the day, remind yourself to relax your jaw: teeth apart, muscles relaxed.

· Avoid chewy or hard foods, such as bagels, raw carrots and other raw vegetables, crusty breads and hard chips.

· Use a bruxism appliance (night guard) if prescribed by your dentist. 

Manage your stress

· People often react to stress by clenching and tightening facial and neck muscles. Choose the method of stress management that best suits you and stick to it.

Sleep

· Sleep on your back or side when possible: sleeping on your stomach puts pressure on you jaw.  Sleep with a pillow under your knees when on your side.

· Get an adequate amount of sleep at night.

· Massage your face and neck muscles before you go to bed.

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Send us an e-mail or give us a call on 905-553-2033 (Vaughan)

(519) 265-7202 (Guelph)

Location

  • 55 Wyndham St. N. Suite T21, Guelph
    3560 Rutherford Rd, Suite 29. Vaughan
  • 519 - 265 - 7202 (Guelph)
    905- 553 - 2033 ( Vaughan)